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Autism: Parent-Focused Approach Video News Release

Tuesday, June 2, 2014

Children with autism often struggle with communication and social skills and programs to help are limited.

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OU Medicine Live Chat: Exercise RX

Exercise RX

Friday, June 6th at 10 a.m.

Exercise is an important part of keeping us healthy. Lack of regular exercise is to blame for health issues that impact a significant number of people in this state and nation. In fact, a sedentary lifestyle can increase your risk for heart disease, diabetes and cancer too.

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New Technology Introduces Miniaturized Pacemaker to Heart Care

World’s smallest pacemaker implanted in patient at OU Medical Center

Oklahoma City, Okla. – Imagine a pacemaker the size of a large vitamin. It’s not the stuff of imagination anymore. In fact, OU Medical Center new tech 1implanted the world’s smallest, minimally invasive pacemaker in a 65-year-old Oklahoma man’s heart as part of a worldwide clinical trial.

It marks only the third such device implanted in the United States.

“Mostly, I was just feeling like I had no energy and had a hard time breathing. Then I was having episodes where I was blacking out,” said Ray Haggard of his condition prior to receiving the pacemaker.

Haggard was diagnosed with an arrhythmia and told he would need a pacemaker. His doctors at OU Medicine told him about a new option – a smaller, wireless pacemaker that could be placed without an incision in the chest. Haggard decided it was the best option for him.

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New Technology Introduces Miniaturized Pacemaker to Heart Care Press Release

Thursday May 29, 2014


World’s smallest pacemaker implanted in patient at OU Medical Center  
 
Oklahoma City, Okla. – Imagine a pacemaker the size of a large vitamin. It’s not the stuff of imagination anymore. In fact, OU Medical Center implanted the world’s smallest, minimally invasive pacemaker in a 65-year-old Oklahoma man’s heart as part of a worldwide clinical trial.
 
It marks only the third such device implanted in the United States.
 
“Mostly, I was just feeling like I had no energy and had a hard time breathing. Then I was having episodes where I was blacking out,” said Ray Haggard of his condition prior to receiving the pacemaker.
 
Haggard was diagnosed with an arrhythmia and told he would need a pacemaker. His doctors at OU Medicine told him about a new option – a smaller, wireless pacemaker that could be placed without an incision in the chest. Haggard decided it was the best option for him.
 
One-tenth the size of a conventional pacemaker, the Medtronic Micra™ Transcatheter Pacing System is encapsulated in a single unit that goes directly into the heart. It is placed through the femoral vein in the groin, similar to catheterization procedures to implant stents, and implanted inside the right ventricle of the heart.
 
In contrast to current pacemaker implant procedures, the Micra does not require a surgical incision in the chest and the creation of a “pocket” under the skin. It is cosmetically invisible to the patient after implantation.
 
The Micra uses small tines to attach to the heart. There are no wires called “leads” to connect to the heart. There also is no external power source to be implanted.
 
Dwight Reynolds, M.D.“We believe this study will prove that this pacemaker significantly reduces the risk of complications that are related to having the larger pacemaker in a pocket under the skin. We also believe the risk of the actual implant will be less because there is less of a risk of perforating things that we don’t want to perforate, including the heart,” said Dr. Dwight Reynolds, the OU Physicians cardiologist who implanted the device. Reynolds also is chief of the Cardiovascular Section of the Department of Medicine at the OU Health Sciences Center.  
 
Millions of people worldwide have pacemakers. They are typically used in patients who have arrhythmias, which are problems with the rate or rhythm of the heartbeat.

The Micra is designed to respond to a patient’s activity level and adjust therapy automatically.
Medtronic said the battery in the Micra is expected to last for about 10 years.  
 
“I think this pacemaker gives us another mode of treatment that may suit some patients particularly well. It truly expands our capabilities to provide pacing therapy for the heart,” Reynolds said.
 
He stressed the Micra is not for everyone though.

“It’s not a defibrillator. It only paces one chamber of the heart with this first generation.”  

Haggard had the pacemaker placed one day, stayed overnight at OU Medical Center for observation and was back home the next and quickly back to his everyday activities.
 
“I was able to get back to life pretty quickly and to doing what I would normally do,” he said.
 
OU Medical Center is one of only 25 sites in the United States and 50 globally selected to participate in the clinical trial. The study will enroll up to 780 patients worldwide.

 
OU Medicine Live Chat: Straight Talk

Straight Talk

Friday, May 30th at 10 a.m.

Speech and language disorders are among the most common disabilities in the United States.  A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds, whereas a language disorder refers to a difficulty understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas.

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